How to switch the baby from breast milk to formula?


How to switch the baby from breast milk to formula?

Babies are born to be breastfed. They should benefit from the best food from day one. Even if they are breastfed for only few weeks, it gives them the protection they need. Some mothers don’t even try, some introduce formula right after the baby got colostrum. Then, there are mothers who stop breastfeeding because they go back to work or because there is a health issue, like baby allergies, and they have to introduce formula to the baby. But every single one of them goes through the same: introducing bottle to the baby.

Choose the best nipple

It might be difficult for a baby, especially for a breastfed one, to take the bottle and to accept the formula. If the baby was given water, there is not that much of a hassle, but in the case when the baby has never had an opportunity to drink from a bottle, the mother may have a hard time to choose the right product and to introduce the taste of the formula. First of all, there are different nipples available on the market; they differ with use, shape and stage. The nipples’ use is: formula, cereal and liquids like water and juice. As for the shape, the baby may like one or the other, especially similar to the shape of the mother’s nipple, and dislike the artificial, too big or too small size. The nipples’ stage should be adjusted to the baby’s age. If the baby is rejecting the bottle, the best way is to buy a few different nipples and try one after another to see which one the baby takes.

Choose the safest bottle

It is important to choose the safest bottle. We don’t necessarily have to see everything that can harm the baby, like chemical substances present in plastic, called Bisphenol-a (BPA). Many environmental scientists believe that BPA may cause adverse health effects, such as cancer, diabetes, obesity and early puberty. That’s why it is crucial to give the baby a BPA free bottle. When buying a BPA free bottle, look for “BPA free” label. But some bottles may not have the mark on it and still do not contain BPA; manufacturers are not currently required to label products with the materials they’re made from. The other important feature of a bottle is to be vented to help reduce gas and spit up. The best bottles available on the market, meeting all those requirements as well as the lower cost, are Dr. Brown’s BPA Free Deluxe Gift Set. They are easy to use and easy to clean thanks to a tiny brash included in the set. And they are loved by babies.

Introducing the taste of formula to a breastfed baby

The first step would be to mix the breast milk with 0.5 oz of the formula. Then, every day and with every feeding the amount of the formula should be increased. The amount of ounces and the frequency of feedings should be consulted with the pediatrician. When to wean from a formula to a milk or milk substitute (such as rice milk or soy milk) will vary depending on the baby, and in case of allergy, of the baby’s allergies. If a special formula is recommended to a baby, most probably she will continue to get it after the age of one year. The good news is that before the second year of baby’s life, most of the baby allergies are outgrown so she will be able to switch to milk or milk substitute.


3 Responses to “How to switch the baby from breast milk to formula?”

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